notpulpcovers:

Invasion of the Saucer-Men (AIP, 1957). Movie Poster http://flic.kr/p/nZg9eV

Classic poster. Never seen the film though, not as good as the poster? I’m guessing probably not.

notpulpcovers:

Invasion of the Saucer-Men (AIP, 1957). Movie Poster http://flic.kr/p/nZg9eV

Classic poster. Never seen the film though, not as good as the poster? I’m guessing probably not.

70sscifiart:

Peter Andrew Jones


I used to buy books based solely on Peter Jones’ cover art

70sscifiart:

Peter Andrew Jones

I used to buy books based solely on Peter Jones’ cover art

iPad apps: Bamboo Paper

I’ve owned an iPad for a couple of years now and as I’ve grown used to having it around I’ve found it’s become more and more indispensable as a tool that I use for both work and my hobbies.

In the best traditions of sharing best practice I’d like to explain how and why I use certain apps and what makes them special. Hopefully someone will find something useful that they didn’t know before.

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The app for today is Bamboo Paper by Wacom.
I probably use this notebook app more than anything else.

At work, where I’m a classroom support assistant, I use it as a never ending, full colour, shareable white board. I can write notes and draw sketches or diagrams for students to illustrate and explain the lesson. These can then be emailed to them so they have a copy for revision or to transfer to their books if they need to later.

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I also use Bamboo Paper as a scratch pad for quick notes in lessons all the time.

I can produce worksheets quickly using Bamboo Paper as well. I find my students like the hand drawn look of them and I often redraw exam questions for them to work on rather than just pass out the practice papers which they respond negatively to. My students are at the lower end of the ability scale academically and suffer from various learning difficulties, exams terrify most of them and anything that resembles one is looked on with horror. Once that reaction is taken away they find they’re able to work through and solve the problems much better.

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For my hobby I use Bamboo Paper to plan and design the buildings I make.

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I also use it to draw the illustrations for my published rules and construction guides.

This is a montage of spot illustrations I did for a friend’s Sci-Fi Dinosaur rules which will be available soon.

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This is a page background from my upcoming Juju Man rule book.

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This is a page background from my Afghan buildings construction guide (also coming soon).

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Why do I use Bamboo Paper over other sketching apps?

Well initially it was its limitations that attracted me. When I first got it there were only three types of pen and only nine colours. I didn’t have to spend time deciding on what to draw with, I could just start to draw straight away. There were no layers or filters and the zoom wasn’t very good. It was, in fact, just like using a bit of paper.

Regular updates have seen the zoom improved (but I don’t use it) and more pens, paper styles and colours have arrived.

The absolute key ingredients have remained constant however, the immediacy and the quality of the ink line. Bamboo Paper’s ink is the absolute best ink I have found. It’s responsive, characterful and consistent. All the pictures I’ve shown have been using the medium ball point pen setting which is my default but there are pencil, crayon and brush options that are every bit as good at mimicking their real life counterparts as well.

My Wicker Man background here uses both ink brush and watercolour options.

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So that’s pretty much it. Bamboo Paper is a great app for sketching and planning, not bad for finished work unless you’re looking for a really polished style and ok for handwritten notes.

I find I can type notes quicker using other apps because my writing’s terrible (I’m a lefty which doesn’t help) so I don’t tend to use handwriting much. You might have good results if you try it.

Please note: this conversation starts about 10 minutes in — by this point my wife and I are both completely flustered by the oppressiveness of the rep.

So! Last week my wife called to disconnect our service with Comcast after we switched to another provider (Astound). We were transferred to cancellations (aka “customer retention”).

The representative (name redacted) continued aggressively repeating his questions, despite the answers given, to the point where my wife became so visibly upset she handed me the phone. Overhearing the conversation, I knew this would not be very fun.

What I did not know is how oppressive this conversation would be. Within just a few minutes the representative had gotten so condescending and unhelpful I felt compelled to record the speakerphone conversation on my other phone.

This recording picks up roughly 10 minutes into the call, whereby she and I have already played along and given a myriad of reasons and explanations as to why we are canceling (which is why I simply stopped answering the rep’s repeated question — it was clear the only sufficient answer was “Okay, please don’t disconnect our service after all.”).

Please forgive the echoing and ratcheting sound, I was screwing together some speaker wires in an empty living room!

I thought this was funny.

I thought this was funny.

notpulpcovers:

Live And Let Die (1973)

Robert McGinnis

Watched this again on Saturday. My favourite Bond film.

sciencefictiongallery:

Robert Schulz - Operation Outer Space, 1957.

Old school style goodness!

sciencefictiongallery:

Robert Schulz - Operation Outer Space, 1957.

Old school style goodness!